On Steve Jobs Passing

For those of you who don’t know, I have been a Mac user since I was a young child. My Dad sat me down in front of a Macintosh SE when I was 3-4 years old, and I’ve been a Mac user since (I am now 25). I have modeled my life after Steve Jobs, and my business around Apple, and I would not be the person I am today if weren’t for Steve Jobs. His passing is tragic, but the world his vision changed is still in front of us. With this said, I would like to share an article I wrote in May of 2005 on my Apple news and rumor website Apple-X.net. Please keep in mind I was 18 when I wrote this. A gallery of Steve Jobs photos I took at Macworld San Francisco 2006. Also see: The Hole Punch That Infiltrated A Steve Jobs Keynote and Macworld San Francisco   A Mac Renaissance? I’m A Mac User, Not Just Some iPod User Articles / Opinion Date: May 05, 2005 – 05:00 AM   The New Apple: Good, or Bad?   The other day a buddy of mine bought a copy of “Pirates Of Silicon Valley” on eBay and invited me over to watch it. Of course, I had seen the film several times, but hadn’t within the last year, so I went to my friend’s to watch the movie. Even though I knew how the story would end, I still couldn’t resist from biting my finger nails, eyes locked on the film as Gates and his chums walked down the halls of Apple. “Don’t show...

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I’ve been a busy chimp lately, and I am proud to introduce my new company CyberChimps.com. Check us out at CyberChimps.com.

A Mad Man’s View of Tim Burton’s Alice In Wonderland

I keep hearing my friends and critics say they were disappointed by the new Alice In Wonderland by Tim Burton. Including suggestions that “it had no plot,” was “nothing but eye candy,” and I can’t help but wonder were we watching the same movie? The Mad Hatter: “Have I gone mad?” Alice checks Hatter’s temperature Alice Kingsley: “I’m afraid so. You’re entirely bonkers. But I’ll tell you a secret. All the best people are.” I think a lot of people were hoping for a drug infused neon wonderland filled with drug-lore, and 90’s alternative subculture. Instead, Burton conceived a portrayal of madness, imagination, dreams, and self acceptance and discovery. I mean what represents someone battling their demons better than Alice literally battling a demon? Out of all of Burton’s films I found his interpretation of Alice In Wonderland to be his most daring, brilliant, and status quo challenging movie to date. With that said, I can easily see how it alienated a lot of his unoriginal pinstripe wearing studded belt core audience, but in doing so made his point that much sharper. Similar to Apple’s “Think Different” campaign it was a call to the few who truly haven’t lost touch with their dreams, childhood, and imagination. To understand Burton’s interoperation of Alice in Wonderland, as well as Johnny Depp’s portrayal of the Mad Hatter you have to look at Lewis Carroll the person (who’s real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). To understand Lewis Carroll the person you have to take into consideration that he suffered from some form of epilepsy, possibly frontal lobe seizures, and at the very least was bipolar. He also suffered from a condition deemed...